Do Listed Buildings need a Display Energy Certificate (DEC)?

There has been a lot of past confusion about exemptions from assessment and inspection requirements for Listed Buildings and buildings within a formally designated conservation area.  Firstly, the limited exemptions that exist appear to vary significantly between the devolved administrations in the UK.  Secondly, the supporting guidance, particularly for England & Wales, is regularly updated and can appear inconsistent at best or even incomprehensible.

As energy assessors, we are not in a position to provide legal advice which you should obtain from a suitable professional where required.  However, we provide these summaries to assist you in understanding the issue.

Energy assessments can also be completed on a voluntary basis if this is an approach you choose to use as a safety net against non-compliance.  However, you should be aware that this may have its own implications.

The information below has been divided up by the devolved administration to which it applies.

Display Energy Certificates are designed to ensure that energy is being used efficiently in public buildings.  They consider how energy use is managed and  the measures that are in place to reduce consumption.  The need for compliance is not affected by the historic nature or otherwise of the building.  As such, no exemptions from the requirements for these assessments exist for buildings in England that are listed or in formally designated conservation areas due to this status.

Listed Buildings and those in formally designated conservation areas within England are currently treated as any other building would be treated and require Display Energy Certificates (DECs) if they meet the other qualifying criteria.

Scottish Display Energy Certificates are designed to show the public how efficiently energy is being used within a non-domestic building.  They are part of the Section 63 framework enabling building owners to avoid making energy efficiency improvements required by an Action plan.  They can also be used as part of the Energy Savings Opportunities Scheme (ESOS).

The need for compliance is not affected by the historic nature or otherwise of the building.  As such, no exemptions from the requirements for these assessments exist for buildings in Scotland that are listed or in formally designated conservation areas due to this status.

Listed Buildings and those in formally designated conservation areas within Scotland are currently treated as any other building would be treated and require Display Energy Certificates (DECs) if they meet the other qualifying criteria.

Display Energy Certificates are designed to ensure that energy is being used efficiently in public buildings.  They consider how energy use is managed and  the measures that are in place to reduce consumption.  The need for compliance is not affected by the historic nature or otherwise of the building.  As such, no exemptions from the requirements for these assessments exist for buildings in Wales that are listed or in formally designated conservation areas due to this status.

Listed Buildings and those in formally designated conservation areas within Wales are currently treated as any other building would be treated and require Display Energy Certificates (DECs) if they meet the other qualifying criteria.

Display Energy Certificates are designed to ensure that energy is being used efficiently in public buildings.  They consider how energy use is managed and  the measures that are in place to reduce consumption.  The need for compliance is not affected by the historic nature or otherwise of the building.  As such, no exemptions from the requirements for these assessments exist for buildings in Northern Ireland that are listed or in formally designated conservation areas due to this status.

Listed Buildings and those in formally designated conservation areas within Northern Ireland are currently treated as any other building would be treated and require Display Energy Certificates (DECs) if they meet the other qualifying criteria.